resources: books & papers

December 2016

This article, written by Child Soldiers International and published in the Royal United Service Institute Journal, argues that raising the UK enlistment age from 16 to 18 would bring benefits to young people and the British armed forces. The article explains that the UK’s low enlistment age is counterproductive internationally, as it implies to other countries that it is acceptable to use children under the age of 18 to staff national armed forces.  

October 2014

By David Gee, published by ForcesWatch

At a comfortable distance from warfare, our culture easily passes over its horrific reality in favour of an appealing, even romantic, spectacle of war. Militarism, past and present, attempts to control public opinion by aligning it with its own worldview. In his new book, Spectacle, Reality, Resistance: Confronting a culture of militarism, David Gee takes a fresh look at a culture of militarism in Britain, exploring these dynamics – distance, romance, control – in three essays, accompanied by three shorter pieces about the cultural treatment of war and resistance to the government's increasingly prodigious efforts to regain control of the story we tell ourselves about war.

Read more >>
2013

David Gee

in Sowing Seeds: The Militarisation of Youth and How to Counter It, War Resisters International, 2013

Military recruitment is deeply embedded in the class and economic structures of society. Its methods, thriving on hyper-masculine fantasies of soldiering and, in consumer-capitalist societies in particular, a creeping estrangement from our most humane values, can be understood as a form of human alienation. Even so, despite the continuing success of military recruitment worldwide, it is still perhaps the Achilles heel of militarism. War depends on large numbers of people agreeing to participate in mass killing. If we can work well with young people, their parents, educators and the media, so that equally large numbers pause to reflect on what soldiers are expected to do and why, cracks might open in militarism from the bottom up.

Read more >>
2013

Emma Sangster

in Sowing Seeds: The Militarisation of Youth and How to Counter It, War Resisters International, 2013

The armed forces are increasingly being provided with access to young people within the UK education system – mainly at secondary and further education level but also within universities and even primary schools. In addition to armed forces presentations and other visits to schools and colleges which have been going on for many years, there is a new push to make 'military ethos and skills' a part of school life.

To understand what is driving these practices and policies it is important to look at the wider dynamics between the armed forces and civil society. This article looks briefly at recent initiatives and developments that reflect a new and concerted effort to see the military play a larger role in civil society.

Read more >>
2012

by Ted Harrison

Reaktion Books

Every nation has its own way of remembering those killed in conflict. Each November Remembrance follows a seemingly unchanging pattern. Millions of people wear poppies, and at war memorials around the world a period of silence is observed. Today young people are taught that through Remembrance we thank those who have given their lives to defend liberty and freedom. But when poppy wearing began after the First World War it had rather a different purpose. The flowers of Flanders Field were worn in grief and as an expression of hope that war would never happen again.

Read more >>
2011

The Skinback Fusiliers, "a fast, funny and deeply disturbing novel about life in the British army today seen through the eyes of three young men." This is a novel based on the real experiences of 3 young men. Serialised on Open Democracy in 2011. Read it and add your comments to the well of feedback this book has generated.

Read more >>
2007

army of noneStrategies to counter military recruitment, end war, and build a better world

Aimee Allison and David Solnit, 2007

This is a book from the heart of the vibrant counter recruitment movement in the United States. It looks at the many ways in which schools and communities have become targets for military recruiters and how those schools and communities have responded - with a powerful movement that seeks to resist the militarisation of young people.

Read more >>
2006

Elizabeth Weill-Greenberg (Editor) with Cindy Sheehan (Introduction)

 New Press

THE 10 REASONS
  • You May Be Killed
  • You May Kill Others Who Do Not Deserve to Die
  • You May Be Injured
  • You May Not Receive Proper Medical Care
  • You May Suffer Long-term Health Problems
  • You May Be Lied To
  • You May Face Discrimination
  • You May Be Asked to Do Things Against Your Beliefs
  • You May Find It Difficult to Leave the Military
  • You Have Other Choices